Turkey Feathers

Sample of Heritage feathers picked from the ground, representing some of the colors of the Heritage Turkey.

-However "Porters Rare Heritage Turkeys" cannot be outdone in feather color explanation:

http://www.porterturkeys.com/phenotypesandgenotypes.htm

http://www.porterturkeys.com/feathercolorgenetics.htm   




Picked the ground this morning. I was impressed.

Another unique feather on the ground this morning

And they just keep dropping.....

Interesting study of wing shapes- analysis/comparison of species from across nine major avian clades & result of the study suggested wing shapes are influenced more from the "bird's ancestors wings" and less on flight style as long believed.

Mid-Cretaceous era, 100 million year old wing & feathers preserved in amber.

Turkey arrow fletching

My wife made these for a wedding.


Florida, undoubtedly the bird capital of the United States. However…. I can’t think of any feather  you can legally pick up except for a wild turkey feather… I guess a Starling feather is ok to touch.



Big fines....no picking raptor or sea-bird feathers from the shoreline or oak hammock.

Sandhhill Crane (do not pick up the feathers)


Wild turkey feather on ATATL-ATATL dart shaft


The reason I bought the original turkeys was to obtain some feathers for primitive arrow fletching.


Well that goal was exceeded beyond wildest expectations ---Fletching feathers, quill feathers, art and historical re-enactment feathers. Most of the feathers just get tossed into the garden-compost cart; still we end up with bags of turkey feathers.


Turkey feathers were used by many native Americans for robes, blankets, rainwear and of course decoration and arrow fletching.


I use some of the best feathers for my hobby of reproduction arrows and flintknapping.

And of course the turkey is an extremely curious bird by nature. "So I have helpers"


                      ATATL-ATATL (spear thrower) with turkey wing feather fletched palmetto wood dart



Newly hatched poult.

So I was reading that scientists speculate the first feathers developed for warmth.

Feather_evolution


Check out the artist redition of Anchiornis huxleyi


And this National Geographic artist version of an early Bird.


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